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Open Access

This guide contains information about Open Access publishing and resources for faculty.

What is Open Access?

From Peter Suber's Very Brief Introduction to Open Access:

"Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. What makes it possible is the internet and the consent of the author or copyright-holder."

 

 

Open Access Explained

Benefits of Open Access

Open access to research increases its visibility, reaching a wider audience and therefore increasing its potential for:

  • Greater citation
  • Enhancing reputation
  • Attracting potential collaborators
  • Compliance with funder requirements
  • Sharing knowledge from publicly funded research.

Green vs Gold

 Green OA Gold OA

The author makes the work available by archiving it in a repository. 

This may be an institutional repository (such as ePrints) or a subject-based or central repository, (such as PubMed Central or arXiv).

The work is made freely available to the end user via the publisher’s website.

Usually this version should be the author’s final pre-publication version – the peer-reviewed, accepted manuscript.

The work is made freely available to the end user via the publisher’s website.

No charges are payable.

The work is made freely available to the end user via the publisher’s website.

Access may be subject to an embargo, depending on the publisher’s self-archiving policy.

The work is available immediately, with no embargo periods.

Source:

http://www.ncl.ac.uk/openaccess/green-gold/

 

 

Librarian